Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The light exhibited on anchored vessels between sunset and sunrise.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Later, we saw her anchor-light higher up our channel.

    The Riddle of the Sands

  • As the sun sank behind the hills (or rather some time after, for we never could be nautically prompt), our flags were run down and the anchor-light was hoisted on the forward flagstaff.

    Virginia: the Old Dominion

  • There are the side-lights, the binnacle-light, and the anchor-light.

    The Voyage of the "Snark"

  • He gazed long and steadily, and there, very dim and low, but at the point he expected, burned a single light — the anchor-light of the Annie Mine.

    In Yeddo Bay

  • Disko, Long Jack, Tom Platt, and Uncle Salters, each in turn, stumped aft to look at the wheel, forward to see that the anchor held, or to veer out a little more cable against chafing, with a glance at the dim anchor-light between each round.

    Captains Courageous

  • He gazed long and steadily, and there, very dim and low, but at the point he expected, burned a single light -- the anchor-light of the _Annie Mine_.

    Dutch Courage and Other Stories

  • As soon as the anchor was let go, we got our head-sail in, ran in the bowsprit, and got our topmast on deck; the trysail was close-reefed, and the sheet trimmed amidships, the anchor-light hoisted well up on the fore-stay, and our preparations for the night were complete.

    For Treasure Bound

  • Our anchor-light was trimmed and lighted and hoisted up, and we went below to our tea, or _supper_, as sailors generally term it.

    For Treasure Bound

  • "Shall I hoist an anchor-light, sir, as soon as it's dark?" said the man, respectfully.

    The Black Bar

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.