Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A librarian. See extract.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The libraries of such institutions were placed by the abbot under the sole charge of the "armarian," an officer who was made responsible for the preservation of the volumes under his care; be was expected frequently to examine them, lest damp or insects should injure them; he was to cover them with wooden covers to preserve them and carefully to mend and restore any damage which time or accident might cause; he was to make a note of any book borrowed from the library, with the name of the borrower; but this last rule applied only to the less valuable portion of it, as the "great and precious books" could only be lent by the permission of the abbot himself.

    Forty Centuries of Ink

  • Those who studied together were to receive what books they choose; but when they had satisfied themselves, they were particularly directed to restore them to their assigned places; and when they at any time received from the armarian a book for their private reading, they were not allowed to lend it to any one else, or to use it in common, but to reserve it especially for his own private reading.

    Bibliomania in the Middle Ages

  • To prevent detraction or interruption, no one was allowed to enter except the abbot, the prior, the sub-prior, and the armarian, [49] as the latter took charge of all the materials and implements used by the transcribers, it was his duty to prepare and give them out when required; he made the ink and cut the parchment ready for use.

    Bibliomania in the Middle Ages

  • The pride and glory of a monastery was a well stored library, which was committed to the care of the armarian, and with him rested all the responsibility of its preservation.

    Bibliomania in the Middle Ages

  • Probably the armarian was also the bookbinder to the monastery in ordinary cases, for he is here directed to cover the volumes with tablets of wood, that the inside may be preserved from moisture, and the parchment from the injurious effects of dampness.

    Bibliomania in the Middle Ages

  • In all cases the armarian was instructed to make a short memorandum of the name of the book which he had lent or received.

    Bibliomania in the Middle Ages

  • The armarian was, moreover, particularly enjoined to inspect with scrupulous care the more ancient volumes, lest the moth-worms should have got at them, or they had become corrupt or mutilated, and, if such were the case, he was with great care to restore them.

    Bibliomania in the Middle Ages

  • We learn by the canons before referred to, that the superintendence of all the writing and transcribing, whether in or out of the monastery, belonged to the office of the armarian, and that it was his duty to provide the scribes with parchment and all things necessary for their work, and to agree upon the price with those whom he employed.

    Bibliomania in the Middle Ages

  • Besides the duties which we have enumerated, there were others which it was the province of the armarian to fulfil.

    Bibliomania in the Middle Ages

  • To guard against this, many rules were framed, nor was the armarian allowed to lend the books, even to neighboring monasteries, unless he received a bond or promise to restore them within a certain time, and if the person was entirely unknown, a book of equal value was required as a security for its safe return.

    Bibliomania in the Middle Ages

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