Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of yataghan.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See yataghan.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as yataghan.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • One day, as he was walking the quarter-deck, he lifted an attaghan (it might be one of the midshipmen's weapons), and unsheathing it, said, contemplating the blade, '_I should like to know how a person feels after committing murder_.'

    Lord Byron jugé par les témoins de sa vie. English

  • One evening, as I was escaping from a coffee-house, after having drawn my attaghan, without having the courage to face my adversary, I received a blow from his weapon which cleft my turban, and cut deeply into my head.

    The Pacha of Many Tales

  • I found that to mix in the world, it is necessary not only to have an attaghan, but also to have the courage to use it; and in several broils which took place, from my too frequent use of the water of the Giaour, I invariably proved, that although my voice was that of a lion, my heart was but as water, and the finger of contempt was but too often pointed at the beard of pretence.

    The Pacha of Many Tales

  • Constantinople, where I lived gaily, and spent my money; but I found that to mix in the world, it is necessary not only to have an attaghan, but also to have the courage to use it; and in several broils which took place, from my too frequent use of the water of the Giaour, I invariably proved that, although my voice was that of a lion, my heart was but as water, and the finger of contempt was but too often pointed at the beard of pretence.

    The Pacha of Many Tales

  • I could recover my legs, I made a blow at him with my attaghan, fully expecting that he would disappear in a flame of fire at the touch of a true believer; but, on the contrary, he had also recovered his legs, and with a large cane with a gold top on it, he parried my cut, and then saluted me with such a blow on my head, that I again fell down in the mud, quite insensible.

    The Pacha of Many Tales

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