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Examples

  • The most dramatic of these conflicts was that fought out in the eastern provinces ca. 319-16 between Antigonus and Eumenes, the despised Greek pen-pusher who proved himself the finest general of them all and was only defeated when his own troops sold him to Antigonus in return for their captured baggage-train.

    Babylonian Dreaming

  • Know that I am at hand with the baggage-train: so come thou forth to meet me with the troops.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Behold, he is come with the baggage-train and thou art naught but a traitor.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • His baggage-train will assuredly come, whereupon these merchants will flock to him and he will scatter amongst them riches galore.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Now some time hath past, but there appeareth no sign of his baggage-train, and he oweth us sixty thousand gold pieces, all of which he hath given away in alms.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Were he a man of naught, his sense would not suffer him to lavish gold on this wise; and were he a man of wealth, his good faith had been made manifest to us by the coming of his baggage; but we see none of his luggage, although he avoucheth that he hath baggage-train and hath preceded it.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Those of you who are in command of the baggage-train will inspect what I have ordered for the animals and insist upon every man being provided who is not already supplied.

    Cyropaedia

  • And so they returned to their old position among the baggage-train.

    Cyropaedia

  • [3] From the first the Cyrus made it a custom to have his tent pitched facing east, and later on he fixed the space to be left between himself and his lancers, and then he stationed his bakers on the right and his cooks on the left, the cavalry on the right again, and the baggage-train on the left.

    Cyropaedia

  • [4] When the army was packing up after a halt, each man put together the baggage he used himself, and others placed it on the animals: so that at one and the same moment all his bearers came to the baggage-train and each man laid his load on his own beasts.

    Cyropaedia

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