Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of bam.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • She never accused her parents of madness or suicide, merely to make a sensation; never 'bammed' an acquaintance by false statements concerning the commercial honour of anyone with whom she was in business relations; never wrote and sent to the press as a clever jest false statements about herself; and never, in any other ingenious way, tampered with truth.

    Lady Byron Vindicated

  • Can it be possible that all the friends who passed this private document from hand to hand never suspected that they were being 'bammed' by it?

    Lady Byron Vindicated

  • Probably due to its status as both a "very, very early production, borderline preproduction" model and a slam-bammed media test car, says Vincent Kung, Mini product manager.

    Mini Cooper convertible is cute but quirky

  • Because if it's the left boozle, we're all going to get bammed.

    Whose Boozle?

  • Ican only hopethat the right boozle is getting bammed.

    Whose Boozle?

  • Today, Martha Stewart bammed up Emeril Lagasse, who will kick her show up several notches by adding garlic and/or whiskey and having everyone applaud those two ingredients, signing a $50 million “notch” of a deal presumably while saying bam!

    Bam! Martha Bams Deal With Emeril To Bam Her Show Up Another Notch; Bam! | Best Week Ever

  • It seems never to have occurred to any of these credulous gentlemen, who laughed at others for being 'bammed,' that Byron might be doing the very same thing by themselves.

    Lady Byron Vindicated

  • Whether Byron bammed him, or he, by virtue of his own stupidity, was the sole and sufficient bammifier of himself, I know not. '

    Lady Byron Vindicated

  • Whether Byron bammed him, or he, by virtue of his own egregious stupidity, was the sole and sufficient bammifier of himself, I know not; neither greatly do I care.

    Lady Byron Vindicated

  • Many of them were depofed; many fufpended; fome bammed; and all who efcaped punifhment made atonement for their offence by paying large fums to the legate, who amafled an immenfe treafure by this expedient.

    The history of England : from the invasion iof Julius Cæsar to the revolution in 1688 ...

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