Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A brothel; a house of prostitution.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • After taking aboard a cargo of slaves in Da-homey, the Balliol College crossed the Atlantic, but was captured by the American Navy; Flashman managed to escape in New Orleans, and took temporary refuge in a bawdy-house whose proprietress, a susceptible English matron named Susan Willinck, was captivated by his picaresque charm.

    Isabelle

  • Susie's bawdy-house was among the finest in New Orleans, standing in its own tree-shaded grounds, which suited me, for I intended to sneak in through the shrubbery and seek out my protectress with the least possible ado.

    Isabelle

  • Falstaff recounts his wild days in Henry IV, Part 1: "I was as virtuously given as a gentleman need to be; virtuous enough; swore little; diced not above seven times a week; went to a bawdy-house once in a quarter--of an hour; paid money that I borrowed, three of four times; lived well and in good compass: and now I live out of all order, out of all compass."

    Shakespeare on Games

  • I replied again, I knew not the house; but I perceived, on a sudden, by the naked queans, that I was now come into a bawdy-house, and then too late I began to curse the treachery of this old jade.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • The young man, willing to undergo such a business, played his part so well, that in short space he got up most of their bellies, and when he had done, told his lord how he had sped: [5139] his lord made instantly to the court, tells the king how such a nunnery was become a bawdy-house, procures a visitation, gets them to be turned out, and begs the lands to his own use.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • It turns out that 5 or more women living in the same house in Canada is assumed to be a bawdy-house.

    Archive 2004-07-01

  • Johnson was once eminently successful in this species of contest; a fellow having attacked him with some coarse raillery, Johnson answered him thus, “Sir, your wife, under pretence of keeping a bawdy-house, is a receiver of stolen goods.”

    The Life of Samuel Johnson LL.D.

  • Needless to say, it involved the division of chief clerks, pro rata, of police graft, of gambling and bawdy-house perquisites, of returns from gas, street-railway, and other organizations.

    The Titan

  • The other night I fell asleep here behind the arras and had my pocket picked: this house is turned bawdy-house; they pick pockets.

    The first part of King Henry the Fourth

  • I was as virtuously given as a gentleman need to be; virtuous enough; swore little; diced not above seven times a week; went to a bawdy-house once in a quarter — of an hour; paid money that I borrowed, three of four times; lived well and in good compass: and now I live out of all order, out of all compass.

    The first part of King Henry the Fourth

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.