Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A dioptric telescope, fitted with two tubes joining, so as to enable the viewing of an object with both eyes at once; a double-barrelled field glass or opera glass.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A dioptric telescope, fitted with two tubes joining, so as to enable a person to view an object with both eyes at once; a double-barreled field glass or an opera glass.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dioptric telescope, fitted with two tubes for the use of both eyes at once: also used for opera-glass.

Etymologies

French binocle, from Latin bi- ("two")+ oculus ("eye"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Geoffroy, because of the two large eyes, and without paying attention to the ocelli, named this larva the "feather-tailed binocle."

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 385, May 19, 1883

  • C. Dumeril, in 1876, found it again in pools that formed after rains, and named the creature (which is of a bluish color passing to red) the "pisciform binocle."

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 385, May 19, 1883

  • In 1869, Messrs.N. and E. Joly demonstrated that the famous "feather-tailed binocle" was the larva of an insect.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 385, May 19, 1883

  • For a long time Vandover watched the boy turning the spokes back and forth, his eyes alternating between the binocle and the horizon.

    Vandover and the Brute

  • I might be caught in the binocle, or engulfed in the whirlpool, or smashed up in the eddy.

    The Writings of John Burroughs — Volume 05: Pepacton

  • The boys escorted me about the town, then back to the river, and got in their boat and came down to the bend, where they could see me go through the whirlpool and pass the binocle (I am not sure about the orthography of the word, but I suppose it means a double, or a sort of mock eddy).

    The Writings of John Burroughs — Volume 05: Pepacton

  • But I felt much reassured when they told me I had already passed several whirlpools and rock eddies; but that terrible binocle, -- what was that?

    The Writings of John Burroughs — Volume 05: Pepacton

  • This translation is very free, but one who wants to know these windows must read the whole article, and read it here in the church, the Dictionary in one hand, and binocle in the other, for the binocle is more important than the Dictionary when it reaches the complicated border which repeats in detail the colour-scheme of the centre: --

    Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres

  • Above them the man who worked in 1200 to carry out the harmony, and to satisfy the Virgin's wishes, has filled his rose with a dozen or two little compositions in glass, which reveal their subjects only to the best powers of a binocle.

    Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres

  • He has filled the centre with medallions as rich as he could make them, and these he has surrounded with borders, which are also enriched to the utmost; but these medallions with their borders spread across the whole window, and when you search with the binocle for the outside border, you see its pattern clearly only at the top and bottom.

    Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres

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