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Etymologies

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Examples

  • There are no black-cock, muir-fowl, nor partridges; but there are snipe, wild-duck, wild-geese, and swans, in winter; wild-pidgeons, plover, and great number of starlings; of which I shot some, and found them pretty good eating.

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • There are black-cock in extraordinary abundance, moor-fowl, plover and wild pigeons, which seemed to me to be the same as we have in pigeon-houses, in their state of nature.

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • From the wood close by came twice repeated the drowsy, fresh chuck-chuck of the black-cock, beginning to fly into the dewy grass, overgrown by brambles ....

    Dream tales and prose poems

  • As the wanderer was usually to be seen bent on this pious task within the precincts of some country churchyard, or reclined on the solitary tombstone among the heath, disturbing the plover and the black-cock with the clink of his chisel and mallet, with his old white pony grazing by his side, he acquired, from his converse among the dead, the popular appellation of Old Mortality.

    Old Mortality

  • Her hawk strikes down the black-cock; her eyes wound the gallant; no chance for her poor companions and kinswomen; even the conjuror cannot escape the force of her charms.

    The Black Dwarf

  • But the foreign woods that trailed along the shore of the lake were admirable for black-cock.

    The Tragic Bride

  • I do not know how Mrs. Scott ultimately managed; but with broiled salmon, and black-cock, and partridges, she gave him a very decent lunch; and I chanced to have some very fine old hock, which was mighty germain to the matter.

    Selected English Letters

  • When we began our walk there was a fine soft wind that felt as if it would lift one up to the clouds, but before we got back to the little house it had quite fallen, and all was as still as in a desert, except now and then the wild cry of the grouse and black-cock.

    Lady John Russell

  • Yes, there's thirty yonder, from the old wife of an hundred to the babe that was born last week, that ye have turned out o 'their houses, to sleep with the black-cock in the moors!

    The Junior Classics — Volume 5

  • The elk, the swans, the black-cock have disappeared.

    Uncle Vanya

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