Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Alternative form of black-hearted.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In one Weibo survey about the ministry, the choice receiving the most votes was: it is a blackhearted, corrupt ministry that uses the blood of the public for experiments.

    China's Government Struggles With Outcry Over Train Wreck

  • So I heartily hope that this is simply a little soap-operatic twist to the initial set-up, to be unravelled as the series progresses, with our blackhearted bumboy prince finding an ally rather than an adversary in the hero.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • Which is the highest compliment I can make: Shusterman makes original choices and takes surprising veers through his story in a way that even I — a jaded, blackhearted cynic — found moving.

    Three for the kids’ bookshelf « The Retort

  • That was the summer-reading-club theme once proposed by a group of blackhearted children's librarians in my Chicago Public Library days; I thought of it today when I saw on PUBYAC a query about "read for fines" programs, wherein children can work off their overdue book fines through time spent doing some sustained silent reading in the library.

    Read or Die

  • We're making it as close to the evil blackhearted tone of the original stories.

    Will ‘Fables’ #75 Be ‘Happily Ever After?’ Bill Willingham Drops Hints In Our Exclusive Interview

  • ‘She was hanging about me all day, and night too, when I was stretched on my back; and you, like a blackhearted wolf as you are, kept yourself aloof,’ said Sikes.

    Oliver Twist

  • Melodrama: "Sunset Boulevard" (1950), his blackhearted screed about the film industry.

    Periscope

  • I am, myself, the most blackhearted of capitalist imperialist pigs, and to me it looks like a contractual issue.

    ‘Tis the Season for Tenure Flaps

  • They have to believe that everyone else is as blackhearted as they are.

    Firedoglake » Safavian Found Guilty

  • Industry could move the economy away from the farming of coca leaves and blackhearted poppies, creating the illusion of a country moving away from the base matter of cocaine and heroin, so as to promote foreign aid and make trafficking of those very drugs less conspicuous.

    Excerpt: Bel Canto by Ann Patchett

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