Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A play where one tries to snap at a swinging cherry with one's mouth.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A play among children, in which a cherry, hung so as to bob against the mouth, is to be caught with the teeth.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A child's play consisting in catching with the teeth a cherry or other fruit hung from the ceiling, lintel of a door, or other high place, as it swings to and fro.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Cookie in an emerald green moirette petticoat and a somewhat _déclassé_ bedjacket, a tight knot of hair playing bob-cherry with her kindly right blue eye, and a rolling-pin clutched truculently in her red right hand.

    Leonie of the Jungle

  • While the others were going through the splendid stables and cowsheds, kept like a queen's parlour, he and the pretty girl were playing at bob-cherry in the saloon, to the scandal of Yerkes, who, with the honour of the car and the C.P.R. and Canada itself on his shoulders, could not bear that any of his charges should shuffle out of the main item in the official programme.

    Lady Merton, Colonist

  • Fronting a creature that would vainly assail him, and temporarily escape impalement by bounding and springing, dodging and backing, now here now there, like a dangling bob-cherry, his military gorge rose with a sickness of disgust.

    Vittoria — Volume 5

  • Without it -- Harry 'll excuse me, I must speak plainly -- you're a sort of a spectacle of a bob-cherry, down on your luck, up on your luck, and getting dead stale and never bitten; a familiar curiosity'

    The Adventures of Harry Richmond — Volume 6

  • Yes, I will play at bob-cherry with them, hold the bait to their nose which they are never to gorge upon!

    Woodstock

  • The Doctor made no reply, but examined the finger: Jack Easy continued to play bob-cherry with his right hand.

    Mr. Midshipman Easy

  • The doctor made no reply, but examined the finger: Jack Easy continued to play bob-cherry with his right hand.

    Mr. Midshipman Easy

  • Everybody appeared excited except Master Jack Easy himself, who, with a rag round his finger, and his pinafore spotted with blood, was playing at bob-cherry, and cared nothing about the matter.

    Mr. Midshipman Easy

  • -- Yes, I will play at bob-cherry with them, hold the bait to their nose which they are never to gorge upon!

    Woodstock; or, the Cavalier

  • Thence by water to Fox-hall, and there walked an hour alone, observing the several humours of the citizens that were there this holyday, pulling of cherries, -- [The game of bob-cherry] -- and God knows what, and so home to my office, where late, my wife not being come home with my mother, who have been this day all abroad upon the water, my mother being to go out of town speedily.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 35: May/June 1665

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