Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An item of clothing worn over the stockings, in fashion in the seventeenth century.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Stocking hose, or spatterdashes, in lieu of boots.
  • n. Hose made to be worn with boots, as by travelers on horseback.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Stocking-hose or spatterdashes, worn instead of boots.
  • Extra stockings or leggings formerly worn with boots, and covering the upper part of the leg and a part of the thigh, but not the ankles and feet.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. protective stockings worn with or in place of boots

Etymologies

boot +‎ hose (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I had yet in reserve one paire of whole stockings, and a paire of boothose, greater then the former.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • I had yet in reserve one paire of whole stockings, and a paire of boothose, greater than the former.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • The first night I sleepd well enough: and riseing nixt morning, I misd one linnen stockine, one halfe silke one, and one boothose, the accoustrement under a boote for one leg; neither could they be found for any search.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • The roome, which was a low parlour, being well searched with candles, the top of my great boothose was found at a hole, in which they had drawne all the rest.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • I sleepd well enough; and riseing nixt morning, I misd one linnen stockine, one halfe silke one, and one boothose, the accoustrement under

    A Legend of Montrose

  • Ribi on his side cried out with all his might, 'Believe him not, my lord; he is an arrant knave, and for that he knoweth I am come to lay a complaint against him for a pair of saddle-bags whereof he hath robbed me, he cometh now with his story of the boothose, which I have had in my house this many

    The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio

  • ‘The first night I sleepd well enough; and riseing nixt morning, I misd one linnen stockine, one halfe silke one, and one boothose, the accoustrement under a boote for one leg; neither could they be found for any search.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • So saying, they both made off as quickliest they might, each on his own side, whilst my lord judge pulled up his breeches in every one's presence, as if he were arisen from sleep; then, perceiving how the case stood, he enquired whither they were gone who were at difference anent the boothose and the saddle-bags; but they were not to be found, whereupon he began to swear by Cock's bowels that need must he know and learn if it were the wont at Florence to pull down the judges 'breeches, whenas they sat on the judicial bench.

    The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio

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