Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of boscage.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In Aubrey's posthumous work on Surrey, published in 1718, the northern part of the hill is described as thickly covered with yew-trees, and the southern part with "thick boscages of box-trees," which "yielded a convenient privacy for lovers, who frequently meet here, so that it is an English Daphne."

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 12, No. 337, October 25, 1828

  • The grounds are ornamented with rustic alcoves, boscages, and a bowery walk, all in good taste.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 12, No. 337, October 25, 1828

  • Some of them were in boats on the lake, and everywhere one went, from the dark boscages, came sounds of music, thin, tinkling tunes played on guitars by skilled hands, and the bird-like twittering and whistling of flageolets.

    Orpheus in Mayfair and Other Stories and Sketches

  • Striding along at a good gait and chanting sonorously, "On Linden when the sun was low," I left the rougher boscages of the forest behind me and emerged, just at sunset, upon an orderly fringe of woodland where the ground was neat and unencumbered, and the trimmed trees stood at polite distances, bowing slightly to one another with small, well-bred rustlings.

    The Guest of Quesnay

  • Be careful in your remarks to every one there, without exception, not to Massow alone; particularly in your criticisms of individuals, for you have no idea what one experiences in this respect after once becoming an object of surveillance; be prepared to see warmed up with sauce, here or at Sans Souci, what you may perhaps whisper to Charlotte [17] or Annie in the boscages or the bathing-house.

    The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 10 Prince Otto Von Bismarck, Count Helmuth Von Moltke, Ferdinand Lassalle

  • They rise amid leafy boscages beside the streams, which form their only power; for we have disused steam altogether, with all the offences to the eye and ear which its use brought into the world.

    A Traveler from Altruria: Romance

  • The flower-parterres shall be riven up; the Chestnut Avenues shall fall: time-honoured boscages, under which the Opera Hamadryads were wont to wander, not inexorable to men.

    The French Revolution

  • The Palace of the Portinari was a great and stately building, with great and stately rooms inside it, stretching one out of another in what seemed to be an endless succession of ordered richness, and behind the great and stately house and within the great and stately walls that girdled it lay such a garden as no other man in Florence owned, a garden so well ordained after a plan so well conceived that though it was spacious indeed, it seemed ten times more spacious than it really was from the cunning and ingenuity with which its lawns and arbors, its boscages and pergolas, its hedges and trees, its alleys and avenues were adapted to lead the admiring wanderer on and on, and make him believe that he should never come to the end of his tether.

    The God of Love

  • _Deductus Vallis_) in the most pleasant and delightful solitude for house, gardens, orchards, boscages etc., that I have seen in

    Highways and Byways in Surrey

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