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Etymologies

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Examples

  • In the late seventies we pitched up here very regularly, usually to drink Bass in the little brick-floored snug with its wooden bench with a hole in it that you threw pennies into.

    Ruddles County

  • She went with him round to the back of the house and across a cobbled courtyard to a low wooden door, and then along a brick-floored passage and so to the kitchen, a large room with a great many doors and occupied by a number of people bustling about.

    You Don't Take Names

  • It was a low, steamy, brick-floored alley between staging that bore a close crowd of pots and ferns, and behind big branching plants that were spread and nailed overhead so as to make an impervious cover of leaves, and in that close green privacy she stopped and turned on me suddenly like a creature at bay.

    In the Days of the Comet

  • Then abruptly I flashed into being down that green-walled, brick-floored vista as a black-avised, ill-clad young man, who first stared and then advanced scowling toward her.

    In the Days of the Comet

  • Shifting the box slightly to the side, Paige looked down to navigate the seam between the concrete sidewalk and the brick-floored alleyway.

    The Queen’s Curse

  • Like most European houses in the Peninsula, it has a staircase which leads from the bedroom to a somewhat grim, brick-floored room below, containing a large high tub, or bath, of Shanghai pottery, in which you must by no means bathe, as it is found by experience that to take the capacious dipper and pour water upon yourself from a height, gives

    The Golden Chersonese and the way thither

  • In houses in these regions there is always a brick-floored bath-room, usually of large size, under your bedroom, to which you descend by a ladder.

    The Golden Chersonese and the way thither

  • A tiny brick-floored room, half underground, with wine-sodden tables, and a photograph of a funeral inscribed ‘CREDIT EST MORT’; and red-sashed workmen carving sausage with big jack-knives; and Madame F., a splendid

    Down and Out in Paris and London

  • The brick-floored room, fifteen feet square, was packed with twenty people, and the air dim with smoke.

    Down and Out in Paris and London

  • She had a table set up in her small dining room that was off her kitchen, with big double glass doors leading onto a brick-floored, covered patio.

    Wild Orchids

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