Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A brothel.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And thus did they roll themselves up and down the city, as in a brothel-house, and defiled it entirely with their impure actions; nay, while their faces looked like the faces of women, they killed with their right hands; and when their gait was effeminate, they presently attacked men, and became warriors, and drew their swords from under their finely dyed cloaks, and ran everybody through whom they alighted upon.

    Archive 2008-03-01

  • Which Thomas Erastus objects to Paracelsus, that he would be drinking all day long with carmen and tapsters in a brothel-house, is too frequent among us, with men of better note: like Timocreon of Rhodes, multa bibens, et multa vorans, &c.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • With anger, with sickness, or with hunger, my lord; not with love: prove that ever I lose more blood with love than I will get again with drinking, pick out mine eyes with a balladmakerÂ’s pen, and hang me up at the door of a brothel-house for the sign of blind Cupid.

    Act I. Scene I. Much Ado about Nothing

  • Thou hast built there an eminent place, a brothel-house (so the margin reads it), and such their idol temples were.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume IV (Isaiah to Malachi)

  • And thus did they roll themselves up and down the city, as in a brothel-house, and defiled it entirely with their impure actions; nay, while their faces looked like the faces of women, they killed with their right hands; and when their gait was effeminate, they presently attacked men, and became warriors, and drew their swords from under their finely dyed cloaks, and ran every body through whom they alighted upon.

    The Wars of the Jews; or the history of the destruction of Jerusalem

  • _ If they were wise, they would rather go to a brothel-house; for there most mistresses have left behind them their maiden-heads, of blessed memory: and those, which would not go off in that market, are carried about by bawds, and sold at doors, like stale flesh in baskets.

    The works of John Dryden, $c now first collected in eighteen volumes. $p Volume 06

  • With anger, with sickness, or with hunger, my lord, not with love: prove that ever I lose more blood with love than I will get again with drinking, pick out mine eyes with a ballad-maker's pen and hang me up at the door of a brothel-house for the sign of blind Cupid.

    Much Ado About Nothing

  • With anger, with sickness, or with hunger, my lord, not with love: prove that ever I lose more blood with love than I will get again with drinking, pick out mine eyes with a ballad-maker’s pen and hang me up at the door of a brothel-house for the sign of blind Cupid.

    Much Ado About Nothing

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