Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The formerly popular sport of setting dogs to attack a chained bull and especially to seize it by the nose.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An old blood sport involving the baiting of bulls.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Yet bullbaiting had a culinary application as well.

    The Foie Gras Wars

  • One of the several RSPCA members and supporters in Parliament, a Quaker named Pease, managed to introduce the first effective bill to outlaw these blood sports, specifically naming bullbaiting and dogfighting.

    The Pawprints of History

  • For example, in bullbaiting, dogs were placed in a pit to fight a tethered bull.

    The Pawprints of History

  • But when the Inglés had spoken to him of the message he had felt the way he used to feel when he was a boy and he had wakened in the morning of the festival of his village and heard it raining hard so that he knew that it would be too wet and that the bullbaiting in the square would be cancelled.

    For Whom The Bell Tolls

  • He loved the bullbaiting when he was a boy and he looked forward to it and to the moment when he would be in the square in the hot sun and the dust with the carts ranged all around to close the exits and to make a closed place into which the bull would come, sliding down out of his box, braking with all four feet, when they pulled the end-gate up.

    For Whom The Bell Tolls

  • But when the _Ingl's_ had spoken to him of the message he had felt the way he used to feel when he was a boy and he had wakened in the morning of the festival of his village and heard it raining hard so that he knew that it would be too wet and that the bullbaiting in the square would be cancelled.

    For Whom The Bell Tolls

  • Five large grey bears had been caught, and fastened in a pen built for the purpose of confining the bulls, during a bullbaiting.

    Pattie's Personal Narrative, 1824--1830

  • Until the early 19th century, the Bulldog used for bullbaiting in England was more active and longer-legged than the breed as we know it today.

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  • With the end of bullbaiting, the bulldog’s continued existence fell to breeders who were only interested in a particular appearance and did not care about function.

    The Pawprints of History

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