Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Obsolete spelling of burial.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • First commending my soule to God that gave it … And my body to Christian buriall.

    A History of American Law

  • Beside, many Italians returning home, and carrying this report for credible; some were so audaciously presumptuous, as they avouched upon their oathes, that not onely they saw him dead, but were present at his buriall likewise.

    The Decameron

  • Within a short while after, he departed out of this life, and they gave him verie honourable buriall, according to that Country custome.

    The Decameron

  • And because in the opinion of her parents and neerest kinred, the time for her deliverance was yet so farre off, as the Infant within her, wanted much of a perfect creature: they made the lesse mourning; but in the next Church, as also the vault belonging to her Ancestors, they gave her buriall very speedily.

    The Decameron

  • If you will not consent to have it so, let you and I convey his body hence, and leave it in such an apt place, where it may be found to morrow morning: and being then carried to his owne house, his friends and kindred will give it honest buriall.

    The Decameron

  • Notwithstanding, seeing he had so ordered the matter, that he had buriall freely allowed him, they cared for no more.

    The Decameron

  • Guardastagno, as them that attended on the Lady: they were layed in the Chappell of Rossigliones Castle; where, after so much lamentation for so great a misfortune to befall them, they were honourably enterred in one faire Tombe, with excellent Verses engraven thereon, expressing both their noble degree, and by what unhappy meanes, they chanced to have buriall in that very place.

    The Decameron

  • Being delivered out of the Court, it was carried to buriall, not like a Burgesse or ordinary Citizen, but with such pompe as beseemed a Lord Baron, and on the shoulders of very noble

    The Decameron

  • Then taking the yong womans body, and ordering it as a coarse ought to be: they layed it on the same Biere by the yong man, and when they had sufficiently sorrowed for their disastrous fortune, they gave them honourable buriall both in. one grave.

    The Decameron

  • When he came to his Maister, and had delivered him her garments, he assured him, that he had not onely accomplished his commaund, but also was most secure from any discovery: because he had no sooner done the deede, but foure or five very ravenous Woolves, came presently running to the dead bodie, and gave it buriall in their bellyes.

    The Decameron

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