Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In printing, a short line of small-sized type between two longer lines of larger displayed type.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • First off, let me say how utterly hilarious it is that the title of this post is the catch-line of the Sci-Fi Channel.

    2007 September | Peter Damien

  • Some correspondents even run a catch-line in red ink at the top of the page, but these yellow journal "scare-heads" fall short with the average business proposition.

    Business Correspondence

  • And so the average man is not influenced so much by a bold catch-line in his letters as by the paragraphs that follow.

    Business Correspondence

  • The catch-line of itself sells no goods and to be effective it must be followed by trip-hammer arguments.

    Business Correspondence

  • The correspondent may use a catch-line, just as the barker at a side show uses a megaphone -- the noise attracts a crowd but it does not sell the tickets.

    Business Correspondence

  • But as Mrs Aubrey Denison wrote and said she should like to forgive him for his disgraceful conduct before he went away, he sent the Scotch foreman of the _Trumpet-Call_ to explain to her that the catch-line of an auctioneer's advertisement had been 'dropped' on the same galley as the mortuary notice, and overlooked when the forme was locked.

    RĂ­dan The Devil And Other Stories 1899

  • His opinion was sought for on every matter of public interest, and whatever happened to him in particular was considered good for at least half a column of copy, with his name as a catch-line at the top.

    Complete Letters of Mark Twain

  • Sales of the potato snack soared on the back of the 'canny bag of Tudor crisps' catch-line.

    Word Magazine - Comments

  • I think the logo is quite good, not sure about the catch-line, "visibility leads to understanding, understanding leads to acceptance".

    Brand New

  • P2P Minnows and RIAA Sharks p2pnet news view P2P | RIAA News: - "All we want are the facts" is a catch-line made famous by TV cop Joe Friday in the Dragnet series.

    Recording Industry vs The People

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