Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The zoology of whales and related aquatic mammals.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The branch of zoology concerned with the order Cetacea, which includes whales, dolphins, and porpoises.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The description or natural history of cetaceous animals.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The description or natural history of cetaceous animals.

Etymologies

Latin cētus, whale; see Cetus + -logy.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The cetology chapter is just there to weed out the easily discouraged.

    Well, it's not like there's an election or financial crisis or anything.

  • As far as the cetology section goes, a little taxonomy never hurt anyone.

    So now will I have to read it? It's not like they did.

  • Yes, yes, the cetology (and faux cetology) can be a slog, no doubt.

    So now will I have to read it? It's not like they did.

  • Ishmael would speak for them at midcentury in Moby Dick, as he dismissed learned commentary on cetology, called on Jonah and seamen with callused hands for support and declared the whale a spouting fish with a horizontal tail.

    Thar She Blows! 19th-Century Court Case Harpoons a Whale of a Story

  • Therefore you must not, in every case at least, take the higgledy-piggledy whale statements, however authentic, in these extracts, for veritable gospel cetology.

    Archive 2007-10-01

  • It will be seen that this mere painstaking burrower and grub-worm of a poor devil of a Sub-Sub appears to have gone through the long Vaticans and street-stalls of the earth, picking up whatever random allusions to whales he could anyways find in any book whatsoever, sacred or profane. therefore you must not, in every case at least, take the higgledy-piggledy whale statements, however authentic, in these extracts, for veritable gospel cetology.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Nevertheless, though of real knowledge there be little, yet of books there are a plenty; and so in some small degree, with cetology, or the science of whales.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • My object here is simply to project the draught of a systematization of cetology.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • As the external difference between them is mainly observable in their heads; and as a head of each is this moment hanging from the Pequod's side; and as we may freely go from one to the other, by merely stepping across the deck: -- where, I should like to know, will you obtain a better chance to study practical cetology than here?

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

  • Vaticans and street-stalls of the earth, picking up whatever random allusions to whales he could anyways find in any book whatsoever, sacred or profane. therefore you must not, in every case at least, take the higgledy-piggledy whale statements, however authentic, in these extracts, for veritable gospel cetology.

    Moby Dick: or, the White Whale

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