chapter-houses love

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of chapter-house.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Originally consisting of three bays of Norman work, it probably, like the chapter-houses at Norwich, Reading, and Durham, terminated in a semi-circular apse.

    Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Gloucester [2nd ed.] A Description of Its Fabric and A Brief History of the Espicopal See

  • Resistance was vain; and they were compelled to follow to a large room, which, rising on clumsy Saxon pillars, resembled the [v] refectories and chapter-houses which may still be seen in the most ancient parts of our most ancient monasteries.

    The Literary World Seventh Reader

  • Resistance was vain; and they were compelled to follow to a large room, which, rising on clumsy Saxon pillars, resembled those refectories and chapter-houses which may be still seen in the most ancient parts of our most ancient monasteries.

    Ivanhoe

  • If these vaults were less majestic than domes of the same diameter, they were far more decorative and picturesque, while the chapter-houses themselves were the most original and striking products of English

    A Text-Book of the History of Architecture Seventh Edition, revised

  • The English cathedral plans are also distinguished by the retention or incorporation of many conventual features, such as cloisters, libraries, and halls, and by the grouping of chapter-houses and Lady-chapels with the main edifice.

    A Text-Book of the History of Architecture Seventh Edition, revised

  • An early example of this tracery occurs in the cloisters of Salisbury (Fig. 132); others in the clearstories of the choirs of Lichfield, Lincoln, and Ely, the nave of York, and the chapter-houses mentioned above, where, indeed, it seems to have received its earliest development.

    A Text-Book of the History of Architecture Seventh Edition, revised

  • The English cathedrals and larger churches are long and low, depending for effect mainly upon the projecting masses of their transepts, the imposing square central towers which commonly crown the crossing, and the grouping of the main structure with chapter-houses, cloisters, and Lady-chapels.

    A Text-Book of the History of Architecture Seventh Edition, revised

  • It had something the air of a rambling infinitesimal cathedral, the body of it rising in the midst two storeys high, with a steep-pitched roof, and sending out upon all hands (as it were chapter-houses, chapels, and transepts) one-storeyed and dwarfish projections.

    St. Ives, Being the Adventures of a French Prisoner in England

  • Phoenician temples had sometimes adjuncts, as cathedrals have their chapter-houses and muniment rooms, which were at once interesting and important.

    History of Phoenicia

  • He has a great desire, however, to read such works in the old libraries and chapter-houses to which they belong; for he thinks a black-letter volume reads best in one of those venerable chambers where the light struggles through dusty lancet windows and painted glass; and that it loses half its zest if taken away from the neighbourhood of the quaintly carved oaken book-case and Gothic reading-desk.

    Bracebridge Hall

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