Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.pl. The garment for the legs and feet and for the body below the waist, worn in Europe throughout the Middle Ages; applied also to the armor for the same parts, when fixible, as of chain mail.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Formerly, the clothing of the legs and feet and of the body below the waist.
  • In medieval armor, the defensive covering of the legs, used before the introduction of cuisses and leg-pieces of plate-armor.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mail leggings are called chausses, mail hoods coif and mail mittens mitons.

    Bath Time: Why Chainmail was invented - Lolcats 'n' Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?

  • He carried his sword and shield and wore a hauberk and chausses of silvery chain, and he came alone.

    THE RIVER KINGS’ ROAD

  • Beneath the shelf, half-unfolded, lay a leather saddle-roll, and dropped carelessly upon it a man's cotte and chausses and shirt, and the rolled cloak he had not needed on the journey.

    His Disposition

  • Which are pretty kinky, considering that if I understand medieval male clothing correctly he presumably had to take them off to remove his chausses and braies and then put them back on again.

    The warrior heroine in cover art

  • Strongfist beat dust from his chausses and adjusted the heavy rivet curtain of his hauberk so that it hung straight.

    The Falcons of Montabard

  • With a brightening glance, the King wiped his hands on his chausses, took the needle case and, with difficulty, because of the size and greasiness of his fingers, pried out the stopper.

    The Falcons of Montabard

  • His green tunic was beautifully molded to his body and at mid-thigh length exposed smooth-fitting azure chausses, cross-gartered in the green of his tunic, that displayed his handsome legs to fine effect.

    This Scepter'd Isle

  • They would accept a runaway novice, all the more when they heard him sing and play; they would provide him a patron and a house harp, and strip him of his skirts and find him chausses and shirt and cotte in payment for his music.

    The Holy Thief

  • Zar pulled on the snug-fitting hose that protected the skin from chafing, then slid the chausses up like long stockings.

    Time for Yesterday

  • Short-sleeved, it covered his torso to mid-thigh, extending over the tops of the chausses.

    Time for Yesterday

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