Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of chorus.
  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of chorus.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Man's best friend, stationed on the roof of most houses, joined together in choruses of frenzied barking, provides the moon, the casual stroller in the street, and the insomniacs among us with examples of his devotion to duty.

    Noise

  • German Tendenz choruses, that is choruses with conscious social significance.

    Labor, Labor Movement and Music Speech by Hanns Eisler, 1938

  • They are a set of fellows (as I conceive) who, being limited by their talents to the burthen of the song at the play-houses, in revenge have got the common popular airs by Bishop, or some cheap composer, arranged for choruses, that is, to be sung all in chorus.

    Selected English Letters

  • The orchestra is said to be large and good, and my principal favorites can be well performed there, that is to say choruses, and I am right glad that the Frenchmen are fond of them ....

    Mozart The Man and the Artist as Revealed in his own Words

  • The choruses were the same for the third night as were the character duets between Walter Campbell, Sam Booth, Anderson and me, which were repeated by request.

    Sixty Years of California Song

  • They are a set of fellows (as I conceive) who being limited by their talents to the burthen of the song at the play houses, in revenge have got the common popular airs by Bishop or some cheap composer arranged for choruses, that is, to be sung all in chorus.

    The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb — Volume 5 The Letters of Charles and Mary Lamb

  • There's also a lot to be said for big, memorable, singalong choruses, which is why Oasis, Aerosmith and the mighty Girls Aloud are also on the playlist.

    Life and style | guardian.co.uk

  • Between the choruses is a palpable silence of assent among the players.

    Stereophile RSS Feed

  • Anything you sing in worship service, even what are normally called choruses, is fine.

    Semicolon

  • Another resemblance between the old English and the modern Norwegian dramatist is that each has felt the solid stuff of the drama to require lightening, and has attempted to provide this by means, in Ben Jonson's case, of solemn "choruses," in Ibsen's of lyrics.

    Henrik Ibsen

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