Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To heal a wound through scarring (by causing a scar or cicatrix to form).
  • v. To form a scar.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. form a scar, after an injury

Etymologies

From Old French cicatriser (French cicatriser), from Latin cicātrīx ("scar"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • A dire vrai on la voit que quand il fait froid parce que je cicatrise tres bien ...

    pinku-tk Diary Entry

  • Aseptic wounds could probably be made to cicatrise more rapidly.

    The Dream Doctor

  • It used to be advised that an elliptical portion of the wall of the trachea be removed; this, though succeeding well enough for a time, was unscientific, as the wound always tended to cicatrise, and ended of course in permanent narrowing of the canal of the trachea.

    A Manual of the Operations of Surgery For the Use of Senior Students, House Surgeons, and Junior Practitioners

  • A custom among the natives here is to cicatrise in parallel horizontal lines the abdomens of the female portion of the community.

    Australia Twice Traversed, Illustrated,

  • It will cause ordinary wounds to cicatrise in a few hours, and even "ugly gashes" will yield to it in time.

    The War Trail The Hunt of the Wild Horse

  • Basil had given her shanks a fresh touch of the bear's grease; and the scars which the cougar had made were likely to cicatrise speedily.

    The Boy Hunters

  • Caliph, who was eager to cicatrise himself and attend the ceremonial; nor could he have been dissuaded, had not his excessive weakness disabled him from walking; at the few first steps he fell on the ground, and his people were obliged to lay him on a bed, where he remained many days in such a state of insensibility, as excited compassion in the Emir himself.

    The History of Caliph Vathek

  • Whoever should once make my soul lose her footing, would never set her upright again: she retastes and researches herself too profoundly, and too much to the quick, and therefore would never let the wound she had received heal and cicatrise.

    The Essays of Montaigne — Complete

  • Allah!” reached to the Caliph, who was eager to cicatrise himself and attend the ceremonial; nor could he have been dissuaded, had not his excessive weakness disabled him from walking; at the few first steps he fell on the ground, and his people were obliged to lay him on a bed, where he remained many days in such a state of insensibility, as excited compassion in the

    The History of the Caliph Vathek

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.