Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A sort of brandy distilled from cider. In the United States also called apple-jack and apple-brandy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But they go to one of my neighbors and hear him telling of the whiskey and cider-brandy that have been produced upon his farm, and they see him mixing and circulating the bowl among his laborers, his visitors, and even his own children; and it is offered also to mine, accompanied with some jeer against cold water societies.

    Select Temperance Tracts

  • As to intoxicating drinks, I remember hearing my grandfather, when he was over eighty years old, after taking a drink of cider-brandy, exclaim: “A good gift of God, if taken with faith and prayer.”

    Personal Experience of a Physician

  • As to intoxicating drinks, I remember hearing my grandfather, when he was over eighty years old, after taking a drink of cider-brandy, exclaim: "A good gift of God, if taken with faith and prayer."

    Personal Experience of a Physician

  • In Livingston there were five distilleries for the manufacture of cider-brandy, or what was familiarly known as pupelo.

    Margaret

  • It is poison into which you convert your rye and apples; it is poison which, under the name of whiskey and cider-brandy, you put into your cellars; it is poison which you draw out from the brandy and whiskey casks for drink, and which you offer your children and friends for drink; it is poison which you sell to your neighbors; it is producing the same effects as other poisons upon you and upon them; that is, it is undermining your constitutions, and shortening your lives and happiness.

    Select Temperance Tracts

  • A strange, tottering old figure, his nose and chin grimacing at each other, his bleared eyes telling unmistakable truths of cider-brandy and New England rum, his scant locks of white lying in confusion over his wrinkled forehead and cheeks, his whole air squalid, hopeless, and degraded, -- not so much by the poverty of vice as by its demoralizing stamp penetrating from the inner to the outer man, and levelling it even below the plane of brutes that perish.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 22, August, 1859

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