Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The position of a client.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Condition of a client; state of being under the protection of a patron.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The condition of being a client; a state of being under the protection of a patron.

Etymologies

client +‎ -ship (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In the place of different political parties what Fatton terms "accumulation alliances" have arisen, based on clientship and centered around the charismatic personality of a particular gwo neg ( "big man"), engaged in a "criminalized zero-sum game" in pursuit of power.

    Haiti: The Fall of the House of Aristide

  • Rwanda and other states in the region consolidated royal power through clientship, military expansion, regional trade in salt, iron hoes, and copper, and the development of new religious cults centered on the monarchy.

    1700-1800

  • The Gadetanian uncle and nephew were put in the clientship of one of Pompey's more recent legates, Lucius Cornelius Lentulus, a cousin of the consul.

    Fortune's Favorites

  • But because, fellow members of this body, because he holds an oath of clientship with most of Italy!

    The Grass Crown

  • "No Marius — or Fulcinius, for that matter! — has ever been in clientship to a Caecilius Metellus!" snapped Marius, growing angrier still.

    The First Man in Rome

  • Rich as Croesus, half of northern Italy in his clientship, a king inside the borders of his own lands.

    The First Man in Rome

  • The still-surviving custom of clientship made the object of largesses difficult to establish, and the secrecy of the ballot, which had been introduced for elections in 139, made it impossible to prove that the suspicious gift had been effective and thus to construct

    A History of Rome During the Later Republic and Early Principate

  • No advocate ventured to plead his cause, no patron appeared for him, such as under ordinary circumstances might have aided him; for instance, one of the powerful AEmilian house, under which his family possibly enjoyed clientship (2Ti 4: 16, 17), whence he may have taken his name Paul.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • The Remi succeeded to their place, and, as it was perceived that they equaled the Aedui in favor with Caesar, those, who on account of their old animosities could by no means coalesce with the Aedui, consigned themselves in clientship to the Remi.

    Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic and Civil Wars: with the Supplementary Books attributed to Hirtius.

  • From this day forward, he is exempt from all subjection of servitude, of all duty of a freed-man, all bond of clientship.

    A Book of Golden Deeds

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