Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A bag in which a cloak or other clothes are carried; a portmanteau.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • • "Thou stuffed cloak-bag of guts, thou vanity in years!"

    Ken Adelman: Bard Blog: Candidate Insults

  • Their only attendant was a page, who, riding a Spanish jennet, which seemed to bear a heavy cloak-bag, followed them at a respectful distance.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • Why dost thou converse with that trunk of humours, that bolting-hutch of beastliness, that swollen parcel of dropsies, that huge bombard of sack, that stuffed cloak-bag of guts, that roasted Manningtree ox with the pudding in his belly, that reverend vice, that grey iniquity, that father ruffian, that vanity in years?

    The first part of King Henry the Fourth

  • It was one cool refreshing evening, at the close of a very sultry day, in the latter end of the month of August, when a stranger, mounted upon a dark mule, with a small cloak-bag behind him, containing a few shirts, a pair of shoes, and a crimson-sattin pair of breeches, entered the town of Strasburg.

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • The moment the stranger alighted, he ordered his mule to be led into the stable, and his cloak-bag to be brought in; then opening, and taking out of it his crimson-sattin breeches, with a silver-fringed — (appendage to them, which I dare not translate) — he put his breeches, with his fringed cod-piece on, and forth-with, with his short scymetar in his hand, walked out to the grand parade.

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • The moment the stranger alighted, he ordered his mule to be led into the stable, and his cloak-bag to be brought in; then opening, and taking out of it his crimson-sattin breeches, with a silver-fringed — (appendage to them, which I dare not translate) — he put his breeches, with his fringed cod - piece on, and forth-with, with his short scymetar in his hand, walked out to the grand parade.

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • Zen I taket my cloak-bag ant money, ant jompet out of ze vintow.

    Boyhood

  • Hal jests in his role, castigating his interlocutor - which is to say his other self, the friend who is now impersonating Hal - for his association with a 'devil' that haunts Hal in the likeness of an old man, a 'bolting-hutch of beastliness', a 'stuffed cloak-bag of guts', a 'father ruffian' and 'vanity in years', and much more.

    Shakespeare

  • He had stripped to his waist and stood under the pump in the yard, allowing the cold water to refresh him and then taken a new suit of clothes from his cloak-bag, rolling up the uniform and stuffing it in the bag in its place.

    The Last Gamble

  • He stood up, picked up his cloak-bag and her portmanteau and waited to escort her.

    The Last Gamble

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.