Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A coachman's seat on the vehicle.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The seat of a coachman.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The seat on which the driver of a coach sits.

Etymologies

coach +‎ box (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Then put on your livery, and seat yourself next to Kalman on the coachbox.

    Excerpt: Embers by Sandor Marai

  • Pisani, the Venetian Ambassador, and Count Fersen, helped her on the coachbox, where she rode disguised.

    Court Memoirs of France Series — Complete

  • “That ain’t a sort of man to see sitting behind a coachbox, is it though?

    XIX. I Look about Me, and Make a Discovery

  • Hence, after a night of pale and speechless melancholy, the gay, animated, happy countenance with which he sprang to our coachbox to take his old seat on it, and accompany us to Rotterdam.

    Washington Irving

  • And I have heard much when I've been on the coachbox.

    Plays: the Father; Countess Julie; the Outlaw; the Stronger

  • The astonishment of the ostlers at seeing the horses covered with lather, and coachbox tenanted only by two boys, behind whom a little white face now peered out, was extreme, and they were unable to get beyond an ejaculation of hallo! expressive of a depth of incredulous astonishment impossible to be rendered by words.

    The Young Buglers

  • I cannot better describe their vehicle, than by comparing it to a canoe mounted on four wheels, connected by a long perch, with a coachbox at the bow, and three gig bodies hung athwart ships, or slung inside of the canoe, by leather thongs.

    Tom Cringle's Log

  • However it was soon put out of my power to determine, for whilst I was debating in my own mind what course I had better take, he mounted the coachbox, and drove away with me in his pocket, till he came to a large house, about a mile distant from this place; there he put down the company he had in the coach, and then drove into the yard.

    Life and Perambulations of a Mouse

  • Thence my wife and I to the 'Change; but, in going, our neere horse did fling himself, kicking of the coachbox over the pole; and a great deal of trouble it was to get him right again, and we forced to' light, and in great fear of spoiling the horse, but there was no hurt.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete

  • 'Change; but, in going, our neere horse did fling himself, kicking of the coachbox over the pole; and a great deal of trouble it was to get him right again, and we forced to' light, and in great fear of spoiling the horse, but there was no hurt.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys, December 1668

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