Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A favorite drink of the eighteenth century, made by flavoring a cask of ale with raisins, dates, nutmeg, spice, and the broth or jelly of a fowl, adding yeast, and allowing the whole to ferment anew.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It is much more likely that the word is a corruption of the phrase cock-ale, a noisome brew used by handlers as far back as the reign of Henry VIII to strengthen and stimulate a gamecock when he was being conditioned for battle.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol III No 4

  • This "cock-ale" contained soft gruel, stale beer, port wine, chopped oysters, and other assorted ingredients which were supposed to make the rooster a raging tornado in the pit.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol III No 4

  • "cock-ale," a variety of drinks somehow associated with cockfighting which either were given to the participants or swallowed by their admirers, and mixing the residue of several kegs or bottles (the "cock-tailings") into a cheap swill sold by saloon keepers.

    VQR

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