Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A partnership in which one may advance capital without taking an active part in the management of the business, and be exempt from responsibility for more than a certain amount; limited liability; a special partnership.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It is registered as a "société en commandite par actions," or limited partnership, a structure that gives managing partners veto power on most decisions made by shareholders.

    Lagardère Shareholders to Vote on Shakeup

  • A New York statute of 1822, later widely copied, introduced the limited partnership into American law, in part based on a French business form, the société en commandite.

    A History of American Law

  • As private individuals, they are made to distinguish themselves as the founders of journals, sociétés en commandite (companies of which the members are irresponsible beyond the amount of their shares), and all sorts of commercial speculations, requiring intelligence and honesty on the part of the directors, confidence and liberal disbursements from the shareholders.

    The Paris Sketch Book

  • If we follow out the doctrine, we soon find that it ends in an absorption of property, not by the community, but by a general and indissoluble commandite [sic], so that the condition of the proprietor would differ from that of the workingman only in receiving larger wages.

    What is Property? An Inquiry into the Principle of Right and of Government.

  • [1] Possibly these paragraphs will not be clear to all without the explanation that the form of association discussed in them, called in French the commandite, is a joint-stock company to which the shareholders simply lend their capital, without acquiring a share in the management or incurring responsibility for the results thereof.

    System of Economical Contradictions: or, the Philosophy of Misery

  • A short time ago, we adverted to the vast benefits that would accrue to the working-classes, by legalising partnerships in commandite; for this would allow the clubbing of means for trading purposes without chance of total loss.

    Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 433 Volume 17, New Series, April 17, 1852

  • The tenant, the farmer, the commandite ', the usufructuary, are possessors; the owner who lets and lends for use, the heir who is to come into possession on the death of a usufructuary, are proprietors.

    What is Property?

  • The master of a thing, as its proprietor, levies a tax for the use of his property upon himself as its possessor, equal to that which he would receive from a third party; so that capital bears interest in the hands of the capitalist, as well as in those of the borrower and the commandite.

    What is Property?

  • If we follow out the doctrine, we soon find that it ends in an absorption of property, not by the community, but by a general and indissoluble commandite, so that the condition of the proprietor would differ from that of the workingman only in receiving larger wages.

    What is Property?

  • But as soon as the proprietor becomes a producer, -- since he can exchange his special product only with his tenant or his _commandite_, -- sooner or later this tenant, this _exploited_ man, if violence is not done him, will make

    What is Property?

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