Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A secular division of land in mediaeval Wales.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To commove; to disturb; to stir up.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To commove; disturb; stir up; throw into commotion.
  • n. In Wales, half a hundred; fifty villages.

Etymologies

From Welsh cwmwd (sometimes cymwd in older documents), literally "abode together". (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The commote court would sit as soon as there was daylight, and hope to adjourn in time for all present to reach their homes before night.

    Monk's Hood

  • He was wearing, Cadfael noted, the same cotte and hose in which he had always seen him, no doubt his best, worn to the commote court as they were worn to visit the abbey at Shrewsbury.

    Monk's Hood

  • After the hamlet of Croesau Bach he would come to a cross roads, and turn right, and from that point he would see how the hills were cleft ahead of him, and making straight for that cleft he would come to Mallilie, beyond which the track continued westward to Llansilin, the central seat of the commote of Cynllaith.

    Monk's Hood

  • I was born just to the west of it, nearby the church of Llansilin, which is the centre of the commote of Cynllaith.

    Monk's Hood

  • Every house in the neighbourhood must have given shelter overnight to friends and kin from other parts of the commote, for the normal population of this hamlet could be no more than a tenth part of those met here on this day.

    Monk's Hood

  • The tale of the morning's events was on the wing by now, surely already being carried over the hills throughout the commote of Cynllaith, but even rumour had not flown so fast as Meurig, for nothing was seen of him all that day.

    Monk's Hood

  • These roots consisted of two varieties, viz: pomme blanc, and commote.

    ROCKY MOUNTAIN LIFE

  • The commote [31] is a root much like the common radish in size and shape, while a brownish skin envelopes a substance of milky whiteness, soft and nutritious, and of an agreeable taste.

    ROCKY MOUNTAIN LIFE

  • The pomme blanc and commote are equally good whether boiled or raw and are uniformly harmless, even with those unaccustomed to their use as an article of food.

    ROCKY MOUNTAIN LIFE

  • Of the various kinds of wild fruits and berries are found cherries, plums, currants, gooseberries, service-berries, buffalo-berries, and some few grapes; among its vegetables and roots are the bread-root, pomme blanc, onions, and commote.

    ROCKY MOUNTAIN LIFE

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