Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any proposition which is subject to the process of conversion; so called in its relation to itself as converted, after which process it is termed the converse.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any proposition which is subject to the process of conversion; -- so called in its relation to itself as converted, after which process it is termed the converse. See converse, n. (Logic).

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. That which is to be converted; specifically, in logic, a proposition which is or is to be transformed by conversion; the premise of the immediate inference of conversion. See conversion, 2.

Etymologies

Latin convertenus to be converted. Compare subtrahend. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • _ 'The given proposition is called the' convertend '; that which is derived from it, the' converse. '

    Logic Deductive and Inductive

  • Hence we should necessarily have a term distributed in the converse which was not distributed in the convertend.

    Deductive Logic

  • In each of the following forms of inference the converse differs in quality from the convertend and has the contradictory of one of the original terms

    Deductive Logic

  • B is A, 'we should be distributing the term B in the converse, which was not distributed in the convertend.

    Deductive Logic

  • Adopting then this slight extension of the term, we define conversion by negation as -- A form of conversion in which the converse differs in quality from the convertend, and has the contradictory of one of the original terms.

    Deductive Logic

  • If we take the proposition: _Some S is not P_, to convert this into _No P is S_, or _Some P is not S_, would break the rule in chap.vi. ยง 6; since _S, _ undistributed in the convertend, would be distributed in the converse.

    Logic Deductive and Inductive

  • Here the convertend and the converse say the same thing, and this is true if that is.

    Logic Deductive and Inductive

  • And the same plan has some advantage in converting A.; for by the usual method _per accidens_, the converse of A. being I., if we convert this again it is still I., and therefore means less than our original convertend.

    Logic Deductive and Inductive

  • In both these cases, Wealth, though undistributed in the convertend, is distributed in the converse.

    Logic Deductive and Inductive

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