Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A convulsionist.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Pertaining to convulsion; convulsive.
  • n. A convulsionist.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining to convulsion; of the nature of muscular convulsions: as, convulsionary struggles.
  • Causing or resulting from violent disturbance or agitation.
  • n. pl. convulsionaries (-riz). One who is subject to convulsions; specifically [capitalized], one of a class of Jansenists in France who gained notoriety by falling into convulsive spasms and by other extravagant actions, supposed to be accompanied by miraculous cures, in response to a supposed miraculous influence emanating from the tomb of a pious Jansenist, François de Pâris, in the cemetery of St. Médard near Paris, who died in 1727. They continued to exist for more than fifty years.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Like the old religious fetishism, with its convulsionary raptures and miraculous cures, the fetishism of commodities generates its own moments of fervent exaltation.

    2009 September

  • Only yourself, and Abraham Chaumieux, the vinegar merchant and crucified convulsionary, could be capable of broaching so infamous

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • Gilboa, and a Parisian convulsionary, who scribbles ecclesiastical notices in his garret, in 1758, is wonderfully striking.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • And as a convulsionary lady complained that he struck too lightly to relieve the feeling of depression at her stomach, he gave her sixty blows with all his force.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 380, June, 1847

  • At considerable intervals I had two or three attacks of convulsionary fits.

    The Opium Habit

  • Westerner, and blend it with the history and literature of my age, and conclude it with his death, it seems like some tragic play, superior to all else I know -- vaster and fierier and more convulsionary, for this America of ours, than Eschylus or Shakespeare ever drew for

    Our American Holidays: Lincoln's Birthday A Comprehensive View of Lincoln as Given in the Most Noteworthy Essays, Orations and Poems, in Fiction and in Lincoln's Own Writings

  • When he was fairly mastered, after one or two desperate and almost convulsionary struggles, the ruffian lay perfectly still and silent.

    Chapter LIV

  • On the other hand, Pascal, who did not appear in the other book, found a place in this as a curiosity; and Christophe learned by the way that the convulsionary

    Jean-Christophe, Volume I

  • I will not describe either the agitations, tremblings, palpitations, convulsionary emotions, nor faintings of the heart, I continually experienced; these may be judged of by the effect her image alone made upon me.

    The Confessions of J J Rousseau

  • And as I dwell on what I myself heard or saw of the mighty Westerner, and blend it with the history and literature of my age, and of what I can get of all ages, and conclude it with his death, it seems like some tragic play, superior to all else I know—vaster and fierier and more convulsionary, for this America of ours, than Eschylus or Shakspere ever drew for Athens or for England.

    Abraham Lincoln. November Boughs

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