Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The long thin section of a coach which connects the driver's seat with the body.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The next day she complained, a lady's chariot, whose husband had not half his estate, had a crane-neck, and hung with twice the air that hers did.

    The Tatler, Volume 1, 1899

  • A shock of dishevelled red hair, a lean lantern-jawed face, desperately pallid; these were followed by a long crane-neck, and this again was continued by a pair of shoulders of such endless declivity as surely was never seen but in dreams.

    The Mayor of Troy

  • On the dolphin-foot table stood divers store of cups; the eye-shutter, the ladle, slender-handled, genuine Mentor; crane-neck and gurgling bombyl; and many an earth-born child of Thericlean furnace, the wide - mouthed, the kindly-lipped; Phocaean, Cnidian work, but all light as air, and thin as eggshell; bowls and pannikins and posied cups; oh, 'twas a well-stocked sideboard.

    Works of Lucian of Samosata — Volume 02

  • Heavens! what notable samples of court breeding and furbelows did the crane-neck coaches, which made our own family vehicle look like a gilt tortoise, pour forth by couples and leashes into the great hall; while my gallant uncle, in new periwig and a pair of silver-clocked stockings (a present from a/ci-devant/fine lady), stood at the far end of the picture-gallery to receive his visitors with all the graces of the last age.

    Devereux — Volume 01

  • Heavens! what notable samples of court breeding and furbelows did the crane-neck coaches, which made our own family vehicle look like a gilt tortoise, pour forth by couples and leashes into the great hall; while my gallant uncle, in new periwig and a pair of silver-clocked stockings (a present from a _ci-devant_ fine lady), stood at the far end of the picture-gallery to receive his visitors with all the graces of the last age.

    Devereux — Complete

  • Ah! traitors, they do not hear us as yet; but, as soon as the dreadful blast of our horn reaches them with proclamation of our approach, see with what frenzy of trepidation they fly to their horses 'heads, and deprecate our wrath by the precipitation of their crane-neck quarterings.

    The English Mail-Coach and Joan of Arc

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