Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To tickle.
  • To wheedle; cajole; coax.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Nae man alive can cuitle up Donald better than mysell --- I hae bought wi 'them, sauld wi' them, eaten wi 'them, drucken wi' them '' ------

    Rob Roy

  • “Troth,” said Mr. Lockhard, “an such be the case, I think the wisest thing for us a’ wad be to hammer up a match between your young lord and our winsome young leddy up-bye there; and Sir William might just stitch your auld barony to her gown-sleeve, and he wad sune cuitle another out o’ somebody else, sic a lang head as he has.”

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • “But to see the malice of men! — some of thae landloupers and gill-flirts down at the filthy puddle yonder, that they ca’ the Waal, had heard of this puir lad, and the bits of pictures that he made fashion of drawing, and they maun cuitle him awa doun to the bottle, where mony a bonny story they had clecked, Mr. Bindloose, baith of

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • Nae man alive can cuitle up Donald better than mysell — I hae bought wi’ them, sauld wi’ them, eaten wi’ them, drucken wi’ them” — “Did ye ever fight wi’ them?” said Mr. Jarvie.

    Rob Roy

  • "Troth," said Mr. Lockhard, "an such be the case, I think the wisest thing for us a 'wad be to hammer up a match between your young lord and our winsome young leddy up-bye there; and Sir William might just stitch your auld barony to her gown-sleeve, and he wad sune cuitle another out

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • Nae man alive can cuitle up Donald better than mysell -- I hae bought wi 'them, sauld wi' them, eaten wi 'them, drucken wi' them "--

    Rob Roy — Complete

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.