Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. New Orleans A dish made by frying or boiling cornmeal or crumbled cornbread, sweetened and served as a cereal.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Cooked cornmeal mush cereal (served with milk or syrup).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. tropical American yam with small yellow edible tubers

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He was a big powerful man, a dark laughing Cajun with white teeth and turquoise eyes who had been raised on boudin, cush-cush and garfish balls.

    The Sudden Curve:

  • Then she would pull off her shirt, scrub her hands and arms with Lava soap under the pump in the sink, and in her bra fill our bowls with cush-cush and make ham-and-onion sandwiches for our lunches.

    Dave Robicheaux Ebook Boxed Set

  • He was a big, powerful man, a dark laughing Cajun with white teeth and turquoise eyes who had been raised on boudin, cush-cush, and garfish balls.

    Neon Rain

  • I call her tite cush-cush cause she always love cush-cush when she a little girl.

    Neon Rain

  • When they came to put the yams in, Quanqua put in a great many white yams, but Ananzi only put in one little red cush-cush yam.

    Popular Tales from the Norse

  • There I remained, with my arms folded, and bowed as before, until dinner was brought in, and a calabash full of cush-cush was put into my hands to place before the king and his wives.

    The Privateersman

  • When their curiosity was satisfied, they then appeared to consider our condition, and having obtained the old king's permission, they brought us a calabash full of cush-cush, that is,

    The Privateersman

  • My first attempt at service was not very adroit, for, in my eagerness to do my duty, I tripped over the corner of the mat which served them for a table, and tumbling headlong forward, emptied the calabash of cush-cush which I held in my hand upon the legs of the old king, who sat opposite to where

    The Privateersman

  • My first attempt at service was not very adroit, for, in my eagerness to do my duty, I tripped over the corner of the mat which served them for a table, and tumbling headlong forward, emptied the calabash of cush-cush which I held in my hand upon the legs of the old king, who sat opposite to where I was advancing.

    The Privateer's-Man One hundred Years Ago

  • When their curiosity was satisfied, they then appeared to consider our condition, and having obtained the old king's permission, they brought us a calabash full of cush-cush, that is Guinea corn boiled into a thick paste.

    The Privateer's-Man One hundred Years Ago

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