Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. malapropism of damp squib

Etymologies

Due to the homeophony of squib and squid (Wiktionary)

Examples

Sorry, no example sentences found.

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Comments

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  • Seafood?

    March 4, 2009

  • The Damp Squid is my favorite restaurant.

    March 3, 2009

  • What's wrong with champ at the bit? Surely it has stronger claims that chomp at the bit to be the original and not the eggcorn. See qroqqa's comment on champ.

    March 3, 2009

  • *froths*

    March 3, 2009

  • I'm not adverse to a bit of frothing rage every now and again. Though it might be a bit of a mute point.

    March 3, 2009

  • #4 and #10 I didn't realise were corrupt, and still think the corruptions make more sense. #8 is the one that sends me into a frothing rage every time. Generally you hear it in the negative.

    March 3, 2009

  • #5 and #8 on that list (in reesetee's link) drive me batshit.

    In case it's someday not available, here it is for Wordieposterity:
    The top ten misquotes by British people are as follows:

    1) A damp squid (a damp squib)

    2) On tender hooks (on tenter hooks)

    3) Nip it in the butt (nip it in the bud)

    4) Champing at the bit (chomping at the bit)

    5) A mute point (a moot point)

    6) One foul swoop (one fell swoop)

    7) All that glitters is not gold (all that glisters is not gold)

    8) Adverse to (averse to)

    9) Batting down the hatches (batten down the hatches)

    10) Find a penny pick it up (find a pin and pick it up)
    ("Damp Squid: The top 10 misquoted phrases in Britain," Telegraph.co.uk, 24 Feb. 2009)

    March 3, 2009

  • Nip it in the butt!

    March 2, 2009

  • According to this, the top misquoted phrase in Britain.

    March 2, 2009


  • See, e.g., damp squid eggcorn

    December 1, 2008