Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of debark.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A messenger debarks to ask Captain Midnight for help.

    Archive 2009-12-06

  • The story of Italian military intervention in Iraq begins when the resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, Michael Ledeen, sponsored by Defense Minister Antonio Martino, debarks in Rome with Pentagon men in tow to meet a handful of “Iranian exiles.”

    The Italian Connection

  • When a passanger debarks, she swipes her room-key as she steps off the gangplank.

    Boing Boing: November 18, 2001 - November 24, 2001 Archives

  • Harry Humphreys and Sam Hussey turn up on some Saturdays, while Joey Long debarks the logs.

    Morgan’s Run

  • Slothrop puts his tux back on, wrinkled and shrunken and almost dry, and debarks with Otto to find Der Springer.

    Gravity's Rainbow

  • Rejecting the obviously allegorical phantasy of "procreation," we may reasonably suppose ourselves to be here in the presence of an emigration from the South Seas or from southern China, which debarks on the coast of Awaji and thence crosses to Shikoku.

    A History of the Japanese People From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era

  • The irate and insulted Corkey debarks with Lockwin.

    David Lockwin—The People's Idol

  • Night drops her mantle, and silently the unsuspected squadron floats down the stealthy waters, and debarks its fateful freight.

    Gala-days

  • TO get to the top of the world, Petra Franklin Lahaie ushers her two young daughters and their girly bikes through a set of heavy bronze doors, greets the 24-hour elevator operator in the Prussian blue uniform, rides up 35 stories past mostly vacant office suites, debarks next to an observation deck and Chinese-themed banquet room, passes through a portal marked

    NYT > Home Page

  • SEATTLE - To get to the top of the world, Petra Franklin Lahaie ushers her two young daughters and their girly bikes through a set of heavy bronze doors, greets the 24-hour elevator operator in the Prussian blue uniform, rides up 35 stories past mostly vacant office suites, debarks next to an observation deck and Chinese-themed banquet room, passes through a portal marked "private residence," climbs two stories into a neo-gothic pyramid and enters a penthouse apartment.

    The Seattle Times

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