Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Waverley, what they technically called deoch an doruis, a stirrup-cup, to the honour of the Baron's roof-tree.

    The Waverley

  • Balmawhapple and Killancureit declared their determination to acknowledge their sense of the hospitality of Tully-Veolan by partaking, with their entertainer and his guest Captain Waverley, what they technically called deoch an doruis, a stirrup-cup, [Footnote 2: See Note 10] to the honour of the Baron's roof-tree.

    Waverley

  • Luckie Macleary's the Lairds of Balmawhapple and Killancureit declared their determination to acknowledge their sense of the hospitality of Tully-Veolan by partaking, with their entertainer and his guest Captain Waverley, what they technically called deoch an doruis, a stirrup-cup, [Footnote 2: See Note 10] to the honour of the Baron's roof-tree.

    Waverley — Volume 1

  • Balmawhapple and Killancureit declared their determination to acknowledge their sense of the hospitality of Tully – Veolan by partaking, with their entertainer and his guest Captain Waverley, what they technically called deoch an doruis, a stirrup-cup,30 to the honour of the Baron’s roof-tree.

    Waverley

  • The Bailie, on this admission, solemnly adjudged the cow's drink to be _deoch an doruis_ --- a stirrup-cup, for which no charge could be made, without violating the ancient hospitality of Scotland.

    The Waverley

  • When the landlord of an inn presented his guests with deoch an doruis, that is, the drink at the door, or the stirrup-cup, the draught was not charged in the reckoning.

    The Waverley

  • [142] The proper orthography of this expression is deoch-an-doruis

    Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character

  • The bailie, on this admission, solemnly adjudged the cow's drink to be deoch an doruis, a stirrup-cup, for which no charge could be made without violating the ancient hospitality of Scotland.

    Waverley — Complete

  • The bailie, on this admission, solemnly adjudged the cow’s drink to be deoch an doruis, a stirrup-cup, for which no charge could be made without violating the ancient hospitality of Scotland.

    Waverley

  • One of them is to give the shelter of the night and the supper of the night to the murderer himself, even if the corpse on the heather was your son; and the other is to ask no question off your guest till he has drunk the _deoch-an-doruis_. "

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.