Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To testify or declare under oath.
  • intransitive v. To give testimony.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To testify, especially in the form of a deposition.
  • v. To take the deposition of; to depose.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To testify under oath; to depose; to bear witness.
  • transitive v. To lay, as a stake; to wager.
  • transitive v. To lay down.
  • transitive v. To assert under oath; to depose.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To lay down; deposit.
  • To lay down as a pledge; wager.
  • To testify; state in a deposition.
  • In Scots and old Eng. law, to give testimony; bear witness; depose.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make a deposition; declare under oath

Etymologies

Middle English deponen, from Medieval Latin dēpōnere, from Latin, to put down : dē-, de- + pōnere, to put.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin depono ("lay down", "deposit", "entrust") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The turnkey, guessing from my appearance that I had money in my pocket, received me with the repetition of the Latin word depone, and gave me to understand, that I must pay beforehand for the apartment I should choose to dwell in.

    The Adventures of Roderick Random

  • The turnkey, guessing from my appearance that I had money in my pocket, received me with the repetition of the Latin word depone, and gave me to understand, that I must pay beforehand for the apartment

    The Adventures of Roderick Random

  • It is come to me also by a sidewind, as I may say, that you have been neighbouring more than was needful among some of the pestilent sect of Quakers — a people who own neither priest nor king, nor civil magistrate, nor the fabric of our law, and will not depone either IN

    Redgauntlet

  • I have visited the sign in question, which yet swings exalted in the village of Langdirdum; and I am ready to depone upon the oath that what has been idly mistaken or misrepresented as being the fifth leg of the horse, is, in fact, the tail of that quadruped, and, considered with reference to the posture in which he is delineated, forms a circumstance introduced and managed with great and successful, though daring, art.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • These two females did afterwards depone that Mr Willet in his consternation uttered but one word, and called that up the stairs in a stentorian voice, six distinct times.

    Barnaby Rudge

  • They had predicted it to Mrs Todgers, as she (Todgers) could depone, that very morning.

    The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit

  • I canna depone to having ever seen ane mysell, but, I ance heard ane whistle ahint me in the moss, as like a whaup

    The Black Dwarf

  • Mr Melmotte had been asked to depone the title-deeds, and had promised to do so as soon as the day of the wedding should have been fixed with the consent of all the parties.

    The Way We Live Now

  • John and Alexander MacDonalds, sons to the deceas'd Glenco, depone, that Glengary's house being reduc'd, the forces were called back to the south, and Glenlyon, a captain of the Earl of Argyle's regiment, with Lieutenant Lindsay, and

    The Jacobite Rebellions (1689-1746) (Bell's Scottish History Source Books.)

  • Inverlochie, and desir'd the Col.nel to minister to him the oath of allegiance, that he might have the King's indemnity: But Col. Hill, in his deposition, doth further depone, that he hasten'd him away all he could, and gave him a letter to Ardkinlas to receive him as a lost sheep; ...

    The Jacobite Rebellions (1689-1746) (Bell's Scottish History Source Books.)

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