Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To strip; to undress.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To strip; to undress.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To take the case or covering from; uncase; strip; undress.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. get undressed

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And the power of discase has often caused innovations in the state, when there have been pestilences, or when there has been a succession of bad seasons continuing during many years.

    Laws

  • The heat of the blood counteracts the refrigeration and, when respiring animals can no longer move the lung aquatic animals their gills, whether owing to discase or old age, their death ensues.

    On youth and old age, on life and death, on breathing

  • But health and discase also claim the attention of the scientist, and not mercly of the physician, in so far as an account of their causes is concerned.

    On youth and old age, on life and death, on breathing

  • I will discase me and myself present as I was sometime Milan.

    absentia Diary Entry

  • Well, then, shall we not be right in saying, that if a person would wish to see the greatest pleasures he ought to go and look, not at health, but at discase?

    PHILEBUS

  • Why, be so still; here’s nobody will steal that from thee; yet, for the outside of thy poverty we must make an exchange; therefore, discase thee instantly, —thou must think, there’s a necessity in’t, —and change garments with this gentleman: though the pennyworth on his side be the worst, yet hold thee, there’s some boot.

    Act IV. Scene III. The Winter’s Tale

  • Why, be so still; here's nobody will steal that from thee: yet for the outside of thy poverty we must make an exchange; therefore discase thee instantly,

    The Winter's Tale

  • Why, be so still; here's nobody will steal that from thee: yet, for the outside of thy poverty we must make an exchange; therefore discase thee instantly, -- thou must think there's a necessity in't, -- and change garments with this gentleman: though the pennyworth on his side be the worst, yet hold thee, there's some boot.

    The Winter's Tale

  • Here we entered, and I saw three of these detestable creatures, whom I first met after my landing, feeding upon roots, and the flesh of some animals, which I afterwards found to be that of asses and dogs, and now and then a cow dead by accident or discase. were all tied by the neck with strong withes, fastened to a beam; they held their food between the claws of their forefeet, and tore it with their teeth.

    Gulliver's Travels

  • Why, be so still; here’s nobody will steal that from thee: yet for the outside of thy poverty we must make an exchange; therefore discase thee instantly, — thou must think there’s a necessity in’t, — and change garments with this gentleman: though the pennyworth on his side be the worst, yet hold thee, there’s some boot.

    The Winter’s Tale

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