Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To untwine or become untwined.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To free from being entwined or twisted; untwine

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To free from being entwined or twisted.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To free from the state of being twined or twisted; untwine; untwist.

Etymologies

dis- +‎ entwine (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Norman gathered the boy up, and as soon as he could disentwine his little arms from about his neck, turned him toward Keith.

    Gordon Keith

  • We still have here to disentwine or disentangle his own from the weeds of glorious and of other than glorious feature with which Fletcher has thought fit to interweave them; even in the close of the last scene of all we can say to a line, to a letter, where Shakespeare ends and Fletcher begins.

    A Study of Shakespeare

  • Stung with irritation, and a sense of disgrace and ridicule and pitifulness in one, Ammiani, after a struggle, ceased the attempt to disentwine her arms, and dragged her clinging to him.

    Vittoria — Volume 3

  • It is a thread of pure white light that one might disentwine from the tumultuary richness of Goethe's nature.

    Miscellaneous Studies; a series of essays

  • (it is absurd; but if I could disentwine you from my soul in that sense), only see my own will, and good (not in your will and good, as I now see them and shall ever see) ... should you say I did love you then?

    The Letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett

  • Or ought I, if I could, to add one more proof to the Greek proverb 'that the half is greater than the whole' -- and only love you for myself (it is absurd; but if I _could_ disentwine you from my soul in that sense), only see my own will, and good (not in _your_ will and good, as I now see them and shall ever see) ... should you say I _did_ love you then?

    The Letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett, Vol. 1 (of 2) 1845-1846

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