Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The characteristic of being doltish.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The character of a dolt; stupidity.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Rodriguez is aptly deadpan when, directly addressing the audience, she outlines a taxonomy of doltishness: The trait encompasses 5,430 sub-categories, we learn, and they evolve continuously, like flu viruses.

    Theater review of 'Como Evitar Enamorarse del Hombre Equivocado': Watch out, men

  • In the absence of more rigorous mechanisms, routine doses of forced doltishness for the PM can be a kind of democracy.

    Ed Miliband draws first blood at PMQs

  • It smacks of disorganization, desperation and a level of doltishness you don't usually see in modern-day campaigns where people are paid lots of money to know who's a contributor and to know who not to take a PR dump on.

    Top Dog / Underdog

  • To be phlegmatic denotes a slow, stolid temperament: in some people an enlightened temperance, in others mere doltishness.

    Archive 2010-02-01

  • And if we persist in our doltishness, he may just give us all the finger, or brush us off his shoulder.

    Obama Camp: Hillary Complained About Rough Debate Treatment, Too

  • Montaigne “strives to give worth to vanity itself – to doltishness – if it affords [him] pleasure.”

    In Which Montaigne Reveals His Lack of Ambition and His Bovine Desires « So Many Books

  • His politics are vaguely conservative, but basic doltishness, rather than opportunistic inconsistency, is their great failing – as when he urges a politician friend to present himself to poorer constituents as "an ambassador from the nation of learning."

    Capital Pundits Parodied: An Anti-Mensch's Faux Memoirs

  • So falleth it out, that having indeed no right comedy, in that comical part of our tragedy, we have nothing but scurrility, unworthy of any chaste ears: or some extreme show of doltishness, indeed fit to lift up a loud laughter, and nothing else: where the whole tract of a comedy should be full of delight, as the tragedy should be still maintained in a well-raised admiration.

    English literary criticism

  • With incredible doltishness they had also left the chairs and spikes beside the track.

    Our March to Washington

  • So falleth it out that, having indeed no right comedy in that comical part of our tragedy, we have nothing but scurrility, unworthy of any chaste ears, or some extreme show of doltishness, indeed fit to lift up a loud laughter, and nothing else; where the whole tract of a comedy should be full of delight, as the tragedy should be still maintained in a well-raised admiration.

    The Defense of Poesy

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