Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of droshky.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A low, four-wheeled, open carriage, formerly used in Poland and Russia, consisting of a kind of long, narrow bench, on which the passengers ride as on a saddle, with their feet reaching nearly to the ground. Other kinds of vehicles have been so called, esp. a kind of victoria drawn by one or two horses, and used as a public carriage in German cities.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an open horse-drawn carriage with four wheels; formerly used in Poland and Russia

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The covered carriage known as a drosky is a rather lumbering vehicle on four wheels.

    In and Around Berlin

  • On a certain occasion I called a drosky-man and directed him to drive me to the United States Consulate.

    The Land of Thor

  • They drove in from neighbouring villages with their produce for sale in a kind of drosky, the carretella as it was called, with its single pony harnessed to the near side of the pole.

    The Romance of Isabel Lady Burton

  • They drove in from neighbouring villages with their produce for sale in a kind of drosky, the _carretella_ as it was called, with its single pony harnessed to the near side of the pole.

    The Romance of Isabel Lady Burton Volume II

  • "I cannot believe that this is the city we saw yesterday," he declared as the Count called a drosky and bade the driver make a tour of the avenues and the gardens -- "you would think the people were the happiest in the world.

    Aladdin of London or, Lodestar

  • I knew nothing of this, of course, and on the penultimate day of the Congress, a Friday, as I was strolling home enjoying the morning after a strenuous late breakfast with Caprice, I was taken flat aback by Blowitz's moon face goggling at me from the window of a drosky drawn up near my hotel.

    Watershed

  • Quarrelsome drosky drivers, incongruous mills, and the thousand trumperies of the place, were all forgotten in the perfect beauty of the scene — in the full, the joyous realisation of my ideas of Niagara.

    The Englishwoman in America

  • Round the door of the Clifton House were about twenty ragged, vociferous drosky-drivers, of most demoralised appearance, all clamorous for “a fare.”

    The Englishwoman in America

  • I did not experience them myself, possibly because my only companion was the half-tipsy Irish drosky-driver.

    The Englishwoman in America

  • The driver of our drosky drove us over the rough cobbles so rapidly, despite the hill, that we were almost overturned.

    Woman as Decoration

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