Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • The material is placed in the dyebath which is then slowly heated, with stirring, to the boil.

    Chapter 7

  • Never place the fibre in a dyebath which is above 50°C.

    Chapter 7

  • Due to an oversight, I accidentally dropped one of my baby's white (actually dingy gray) Trumpette socks into a dyebath.

    Dyeing Day: Microwave!

  • She says she loves the sometimes unexpected outcomes from the process and manipulating the final look of the fabric just by moving it around in the dyebath.

    Fab Fabrics: Hand-Dyed Hemp from Noonday Textiles

  • When removed from the dyebath and cooled, the coating becomes hard and crystalline, even varnish-like: This makes the color permanent.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Earlier, however, William Petty credited dyers with a slightly different explanation of the need for these assistants. 15 Petty noted that the addition of alum or other mineral salts to the dyebath allowed fibers to better accept color.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • In that explanation, the dye assistants added to the dyebath removed an outer layer of the fiber during the dye process. reference This brightened the final color, much as removing the gummy, varnish-like outer coating on silk made that fiber brighter and easier to dye. reference

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • The dyebath may easily become either over - or under-fermented, resulting in a useless vat or a poor result.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • The following week began with preparation of the tonne au noir, the alum and gall mordants, and a dyebath of weld (for yellows), all in sufficient quantities for every color that would require them.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • He further suggested that, rather than risk using an over-fermented but partially exhausted dyebath, dyers could obtain a better light blue color by adding a smaller quantity of indigo.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

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