Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A tendency towards co-operation with other denominations; ecumenism.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The character of being ecumenical.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But one might also argue that this decision was wisely taken: the whole issue of ecumenicity was situated in the wrong context, that is, of discussing the principle of economy.

    Orthodoxy on churches outside "the Church"

  • Perhaps the desire for ecumenicity blunted the power of prayer times, though ecumenicity was solely Christian and did not extend to denying the name of Christ.

    BatesLine: March 2005 Archives

  • In addition to his British decorations, the French awarded him the Legion of Honour; the Belgians, the Order of Leopold and, as a mark of the ecumenicity of the man, he had the distinction among Roman Catholic prelates of joining an Orange order, when he accepted from the grateful Dutch, the Order of Orange Nassau.

    The Vatican Council and French Canada

  • + Theories of conciliar and of papal infallibility do not logically stand or fall together, since in the Catholic view the co-operation and confirmation of the pope in his purely primatial capacity are necessary, according to the Divine constitution of the Church, for the ecumenicity and infallibility of a council.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • And as the pope's supremacy is also an essential factor in the constitution of an ecumenical council -- and has in fact been the formal and determining factor in deciding the ecumenicity of those very councils whose authority is recognized by Eastern schismatics and Anglicans -- it naturally occurs to enquire how conciliar infallibility is related to papal.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • This has, de facto, been the formal test of ecumenicity; and it would be necessary even in the hypothesis that the pope himself were fallible.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • For ecumenicity in the adequate sense all the bishops of the world in communion with the Holy See should be summoned, but it is not required that all or even a majority should be present.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • It is physically impossible to bring together all the bishops of the world, nor is there any standard by which to determine even an approximate number, or proportion, of prelates necessary to secure ecumenicity.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • Even they who refuse to see in the papal confirmation an authentic testimony and sentence, declaring infallibly the ecumenicity of the council and its decrees to be a dogmatic fact, must admit that it is a sanative act and supplies possible defects and shortcomings; the Ecumenical authority of the pope is sufficient to impart validity and infallibility to the decrees he makes his own by officially ratifying them.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • Chalcedon, affords the best proof that, in the sense of the Church, the essential constituent element of ecumenicity is less the proportion of bishops present to bishops absent than the organic connection of the council with the head of the Church.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

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