Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The transmission of a fluid or gas from without inward in the phenomena, or by the process, of osmose.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as endosmosis.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He has nothing more for you, nor you for him; but he may be rich in juices wherewithal to nourish the heart of another man, and their two lives, set together, may have an endosmose and exosmose whose result shall be richness of soil, grandeur of growth, beauty of foliage, and perfectness of fruit; while you and he would only have languished into aridity and a stunted crab-tree.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 59, September, 1862

  • There is the rapprochement of proximity on the Esplanade and the bathing beach, where one gets a little of his fellow-creatures in a sort of spiritual endosmose and exosmose.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 12, No. 32, November, 1873

  • We endeavor to explain by chemical laws the reduction of the materials which earth and air furnish, to a form in which they can be appropriated by the tree; by endosmose and exosmose we think we have overcome the obstacles to a clear comprehension of the circulation of the sap; and by a cell-theory we believe we have explained the whole growth of wood and leaves and fruit.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 21, July, 1859

  • Europe and America after the French Revolution, and exceptionally there may be an instance of an individual passing from one class into another, analogously to the endosmose and exosmose of molecules, or, to use the phrase of M. Dumont, by a sort of "social capillarity."

    Socialism and Modern Science (Darwin, Spencer, Marx)

  • He has nothing more for you, nor you for him; but he may be rich in juices wherewithal to nourish the heart of another man, and their two lives, set together, may have an endosmose and exosmose whose result shall be richness of soil, grandeur of growth, beauty of foliage, and perfectness of fruit, while you and he would only have languished into aridity and a stunted crab-tree.

    The Wit and Humor of America, Volume IV. (of X.)

  • Possibly, a spiritual action analogous to exosmose and endosmose, takes place between certain souls.

    The Flight of the Shadow

  • The serum in poor Fougas was dried up in his veins; the water which we have gradually introduced by a slow endosmose has saturated the albumen and fibrin of the serum, which is returned to the liquid state.

    The Man With The Broken Ear

  • Now, in the case of plants which are able to absorb already soluble matter from captured insects, though not capable of true digestion, the solvent just referred to, which must be occasionally present in the glands, would be apt to exude from the glands together with the viscid secretion, inasmuch as endosmose is accompanied by exosmose.

    Insectivorous Plants

  • Moreover, when leaves are immersed in dense vegetable solutions, or in glycerine, the fluid within the gland-cells passes outwards, and there is aggregation; and when the leaves are afterwards immersed in water, or in an innocuous fluid of less specific gravity than water, the protoplasm is redissolved, and this, no doubt, is due to endosmose.

    Insectivorous Plants

  • a chemist and physicist myself, knowing something about capillary attraction, exosmose, endosmose, atmospheric pressure, and gravitation generally, and the movements caused by chemical attraction, I am afraid

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 385, May 19, 1883

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