Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The middle part of a play that develops the action leading to the catastrophe.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The second part of a play, in which the action begins.
  • n. The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated.
  • n. The period of violence in a fever or disease; paroxysm.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. That part which embraces the main action of a play, poem, and the like, and leads on to the catastrophe; -- opposed to protasis.
  • n. The period of violence in a fever or disease; paroxysm.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. That part of an ancient drama which embraces the main action of the play and leads on to the catastrophe; also, that part of an oration which appeals to the passions: opposed to protasis.
  • n. In logic, the consequent term of a proposition.
  • n. In medicine, the beginning and increase of a fever.
  • n. In music, the raising of the voice or the strings of an instrument from a lower to a higher pitch: opposed to anesis.

Etymologies

Greek, stretching, intensity, from epiteinein, epita-, to stretch, intensify : epi-, epi- + teinein, to stretch; see ten- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Ancient Greek ἐπίτασις ("stretching"), from ἐπιτείνω ("to stretch"), from ἐπί + τείνω ("stretch"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Which is incredible to think that the food you're putting in is also, it's almost the epitasis of globalization, you know, you are talking about growing local, consuming local, so that you can get rid some of the oil.

    CNN Transcript Apr 22, 2007

  • How my uncle Toby and Corporal Trim managed this matter, — with the history of their campaigns, which were no way barren of events, — may make no uninteresting under-plot in the epitasis and working-up of this drama. —

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • -- Ed. [147] Epitasis, Greek epitasis the point in a play wherein the plot thickens.

    Commentary on Genesis - Volume 2

  • It doubles itself in the middle of his life, reflects itself in another, repeats itself, protasis, epitasis, catastasis, catastrophe.

    Ulysses

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.