Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of etymology.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • More on etymologies from the feature name finder at the the 1994 Atlas of Mars and Viking Orbiter image-finder.

    Archive 2004-04-01

  • I don't have my Greek references with me, so I'll have to defer a response on the name etymologies for a couple of days.

    languagehat.com: NARTS FOR CHRISTMAS.

  • The word "credit," speaking of telling etymologies, comes from the Latin credere, which means "to trust."

    City Journal

  • I've been working on word etymologies in Etruscan and I'm finding that some origins of certain words are hard to determine.

    Etruscan entry into Italy

  • The goal is to highlight the relevance of recognizing that when word etymologies are reconstructed for words spoken by contemporary Ruvu speakers throughout this work, it is often the case that elements of the cultures of much earlier ancestral language communities are revealed because those words commonly represent inherited material culture, ideas, and the like that once characterized communities of long, long ago.

    Societies, Religion, and History: Central East Tanzanians and the World They Created, c. 200 BCE to 1800 CE

  • I also have hypothetical roots deduced by analysing word etymologies in my database, such as *Carθaza "Carthage" ascertained from the attested name Karθazie whose context lies in TLE 724, but I decided to leave this all out for now.

    Etruscan Glossary (Draft 001 available for Free Download)

  • Yet the last and most popular of these etymologies is refuted by Ptolemy, (Arabia, p. 2,

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • Moreover, words such as amartia and sumphora, which have a bad sense, viewed in the light of their etymologies will be the same as sunesis and episteme and other words which have a good sense (i.e., omartein, sunienai, epesthai, sumphersthai) and much the same may be said of amathia and akolaia, for amathia may be explained as e ama theo iontos poreia, and akolasia as e akolouthia tois pragmasin.

    The CRATYLUS

  • Yet I half suspect he went no farther for his learning, than the index of Hebrew names and etymologies, which is printed at the end of some

    English Satires

  • Moreover, words such as amartia and sumphora, which have a bad sense, viewed in the light of their etymologies will be the same as sunesis and episteme and other words which have a good sense (compare omartein, sunienai, epesthai, sumpheresthai); and much the same may be said of amathia and akolasia, for amathia may be explained as e ama theo iontos poreia, and akolasia as e akolouthia tois pragmasin.

    Cratylus

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