Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having a fair face.
  • Double-faced; flatteringly deceptive; professing great love or kindness without reality.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Already, over unknown trails and chartless wildernesses, were the harbingers of the steel arriving, — fair-faced, blue-eyed, indomitable men, incarnations of the unrest of their race.

    “The Kipling of the Klondike”: Naturalism in London's Early Fiction

  • Yet, when the time came, she proved herself capable of rising to the height of the fair-faced royal races and of renouncing in right regal fashion.

    THE STORY OF JEES UCK

  • Already, over unknown trails and chartless wildernesses, were the harbingers of the steel arriving, -- fair-faced, blue-eyed, indomitable men, incarnations of the unrest of their race.

    THE GOD OF HIS FATHERS

  • For a day, a weekend, a week, up to even a month or two, Chinese companies are willing to pay high prices for fair-faced foreigners to join them as fake employees or business partners.

    Chinese Companies 'Renting' White People, CNN Reports

  • For a day, a weekend, a week, up to even a month or two, Chinese companies are willing to pay high prices for fair-faced foreigners ...

    Chinese Companies 'Renting' White People, CNN Reports

  • There should be more space in the collective consciousness devoted to fair-faced Demetrius.

    things I still see, even after repeated viewing

  • Thereupon they made ready the séance of wassail; the fair-faced cup-companions came and the pure wine252 went round amongst them, till the cup came to the stranger, who rose to his feet and spake thus,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Withal she had covered up the lovely shapeliness of her legs with long boots of deer-leather, and her surcoat was wide-sleeved; she was well hidden, and whereas she was a tall and strong woman, she might well pass for a young man, slender and fair-faced.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Yet no one was able to persuade her mind and will, so wrath was she in her heart; but she stubbornly rejected all their words: for she vowed that she would never set foot on fragrant Olympus nor let fruit spring out of the ground, until she beheld with her eyes her own fair-faced daughter.

    Hesiod, Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

  • Published in two parts as Hyperion and The Fall Of HyperionThe award winning SF epic that begins as a new Canterbury Tales and ends as a dark tale of rebellion against a fair-faced foe.

    Authorial self-reference at work

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