Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In ship-building, a cover or filling-piece fitted in front or rear of any projection or abrupt break in the surface of the under-water parts of a vessel's hull, to permit the water to flow past smoothly and without eddying.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Take to every quart of White-honey, six quarts of fair-water.

    The Closet of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened

  • As you peel them, throw them into a bason of fair-water, which preserves them white.

    The Closet of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened

  • Gather them of the last nights growth; and to preserve them white, it is well to cast them into a pitcher of fair-water, as you gather them: But that is not absolutely necessary, if you will go about dressing them as soon as you come home.

    The Closet of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened

  • Boil the meat in little pieces (if Chicken, flead and beaten) in the Pan with a pint of fair-water, with due seasoning.

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  • Put these into a Gallon of fair-water; skim it very well; Then put into it one Ounce of Harts-horn, and one Ounce of Ivory.

    The Closet of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened

  • Take Roots of Horse-radish scraped clean, and lay them to soak in fair-water for an hour.

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  • Try if the juyce of Apples (strained out of rasped Apples) in such sort, as you make Marmulate of Quinces, with the juyce of Quinces, would not be better, then fair-water, to boil your Apples and Sugar in.

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  • Some, when they take their Bees, put the honey-combs into fair-water, and make it so strong of the honey that it will bear an Egg; and then boil it with some Spice, and put it into a barrel: but I think it not so good, as that which is made of pure honey.

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  • The tryal of that is, to take a tin or silver plate, and wet it with fair-water, and drop a little of the boiling juyce upon the wet plate; if it stick to the plate, it is not enough; but if it fall off (when you slope the Plate) without sticking at all to it, then is it enough: and then you put it into flat shallow Tin forms, first wetted with cold water, and let it stand in them four or five hours in a cold place, till it be quite cold.

    The Closet of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened

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