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  • I do too, and I don't even have good friends who are Cajun musicians! Love the music though. :)

    January 20, 2010

  • I hear accordions and fiddles when I read this word. Some good friends are Cajun musicians.

    January 20, 2010

  • I saw this on the Zeitgeist and came here to mention: My friend wrote an awesome screenplay called Fais Do-Do. I hope it gets made.

    But then I noticed that I already said that.

    January 20, 2010

  • It's an expression for when Cajuns go to a dance that lasts all night...until its time for bed. It's like the expression"Dancing the night away..." literally. LOL =)

    January 20, 2010

  • It doesn't make much sense as you describe it--but then again, sometimes those are the great ones. :-)

    February 19, 2008

  • It was kind of a mix of "Raising Arizona" and "Little Miss Sunshine," or else "Down and Out in Beverly Hills," but set in Louisiana, if that makes sense.

    It probably doesn't.

    February 19, 2008

  • No, I meant c_b's friend's screenplay. Unless you already know about it, Treeseed. ;-)

    February 16, 2008

  • Yep.

    February 16, 2008

  • Neat. Does it involve Cajun dancing?

    February 16, 2008

  • My friend wrote an awesome screenplay called Fais Do-Do. I hope it gets made.

    February 15, 2008

  • Fais do-do is a name for a Cajun dance party, originating before World War II. According to Mark Humphrey's notes from the Roots n' Blues CD "Cajun Dance Party - Fais Do-Do", the parties were named for "...the gentle command ('go to sleep') young mothers offered bawling infants." He quotes early Cajun musician Edwin Duhon of the Hackberry Ramblers, "She'd go to the cry room, give the baby a nipple and say, 'Fais do-do.' She'd want the baby to go to sleep fast, 'cause she's worried about her husband dancing with somebody else out there."

    'Do-do' itself is a shortening of the French verb dormir (to sleep), used primarily in speaking to small children. Comparable to the American English "beddy-bye", it is still commonly used by French-speaking people.

    _Wikipedia

    February 15, 2008